Ying Bin - Wanbao Hao Ren Feature 7th Nov 2018

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In our everyday lives, acts of kindness are in abundance although they may seem hidden.

It was an honor to have two people from our community featured in Lianhe Wanbao under the third series of “Good People, Good Deeds and Good Rice”.

This campaign by Lianhe Wanbao and Song He Rice Company, was run to show appreciation for acts of kindness done by individuals. Song He Rice Company would then donate rice and oil to the individuals’ organisation of choice.

HealthServe's Chinese Migrant Brother Ying Bin, who has been with us for almost 7 months was featured because of his care of a fellow colleague who suffered a stroke.

Here’s an English Translation of the article:

Migrant worker frequently visits his colleague with stroke in the hospital

Due to a worksite accident involving faulty machinery, a nerve in Ying Bin’s leg was severed. However, Ying Bin did not blame his colleague, XL (pseudonym), who handed him the machine to operate, and even became XL’s companion and mental support when he suffered a stroke.

Li Ying Bin, 50 years old, hails from China, Hebei, ShiJiaZhuang. He came to Singapore to work as a construction worker, and has been here for approximately 6 years. In February this year, XL and Ying Bin were preparing to slice steel rods as usual. As the tool which they usually utilise was not in the storeroom, XL had no choice but to use an alternative tool - one which they had never used before.

Just as Ying Bin plugged in the equipment into a power socket, the equipment, which was laying on the floor, started moving. It revolved in a semi-circle before coming into contact with Ying Bin’s right foot, slicing his nerve. He started to bleed profusely. During Ying Bin’s period of recuperation, XL brought him food everyday.

About 4 months later, XL suffered a stroke at his worksite, leaving him unable to move or speak. This took a toil on his emotional state.

By then, Ying Bin who had already stopped work and is in the midst of assessing his work- injury compensation, rushed to the hospital to visit XL. He says “The first time I visited him at the hospital, XL became so emotional as soon as he saw a familiar face. He was relieved that he still had someone by his side. XL even cried when I left the hospital”.

Subsequently, Ying Bin visits XL at the hospital thrice every week. Occasionally, he would buy fruits over with money from his own pocket. Due to XL’s worry about the future, Ying Bin would often spend time chatting with him, assisting XL in regulating his emotions. Even if it was deep into the night, XL would still send Ying Bin text messages whenever he feels emotional as he relied on Ying Bin for mental support. Ying Bin even sought help from social workers from HealthServe to assist XL in his recovery.

Although XL can be perceived to be partially liable for Ying Bin’s injury, Ying Bin has never faulted him in any way. Instead, he says, “I am the one who is injured, why should I blame others? When I was injured, he (XL) would buy me food everyday. I am very thankful for that.”

Helping out in the office

Despite his injury, Ying Bin continues to help out in HealthServe’s premises. Apart from imparting his dumpling-making skills to youths, he would also help to tidy up the office and water the plants.

While waiting for his work-injury compensation to be processed, Ying Bin often visits HealthServe to meet up with the social workers and have meals with them. With time, strong ties formed and YB would take the initiative to help out with tasks. This includes watering the plants and tidying up the office. He says “As long as no one is doing it, I will do it.”

During Children’s Day this year, Ying Bin, along with his fellow migrant brothers and HealthServe staff taught children-at-risk dumpling-making, allowing them to experience the festive atmosphere.

Ying Bin also spends 1 hour daily teaching Hanyu Pinyin to the husband of one HealthServe volunteer*. He says: ”Regardless of who or what you are rendering help to, it is always a good feeling to help others”.

500kg of rice and 60 litres of Canola oil was donated to Willing Hearts

In commendation for Ying Bin’s acts of kindness, Song He Rice Company will be donating 500 kilogram of rice and 60 litres of Canola oil to Ying Bin’s organisation of choice - Willing Hearts. The organisation was founded in 2005. Through their soup kitchen, they support less- privileged individuals including persons with disability, low income households, the elderly and single-parent households. Everyday, Willing Hearts provides 5000 portions of free food for its beneficiaries, delivering them to over 40 locations. Other services provided include TCM, dental or eye care services. With 32 centres in Singapore, it provides assistance to 14,500 less-privileged individuals including the elderly, teenagers and children.

*Note from HealthServe: YB has offered his help to teach the husband of one of our staff Chinese but we would like to correct that it has not been a daily activity and has only happened a few times.


Jeffrey Chua - Wanbao Hao Ren Feature 3rd November 2018

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In our everyday lives, acts of kindness are in abundance although they may seem hidden.

It was an honor to have two people from our community featured in Lianhe Wanbao under the third series of “Good People, Good Deeds and Good Rice”.

This campaign by Lianhe Wanbao and Song He Rice Company, was run to show appreciation for acts of kindness done by individuals. Song He Rice Company would then donate rice and oil to the individuals’ organisation of choice.

HealthServe's Head of Casework and Social Assistance, Jeffrey Chua was highlighted because of his work in HealthServe with the migrants who come to us.

Here’s an English Translation of the article:

Jeffrey Chua is the head of Casework and Social Assistance in HealthServe. He treats the migrant workers as friends, rather than “cases” at work. There was an instance in which an Indian migrant worker encountered a workplace injury, resulting in paralysis. On his day of repatriation, however, the worker experienced high fever. Despite that, his employer insisted on sending X back to India on that very day.

After Jeffrey came to know about the situation, he rushed to the airport at 2 a.m. to ensure that X received proper medical treatment before being sent home. Upon Jeffrey’s arrival, he found X in a state of coma, where he could only lie on the ground. How would X be able to endure a long-haul flight? Furthermore, his flight was on a budget airline with a 3 hours layover in Chennai.

Jeffrey, who is familiar with the laws under Ministry of Manpower, negotiated with the employer to arrange for X to return home on another day instead. He persuaded the employer to send X to the hospital for further examination. After the examination, the employer was instructed by the doctor to purchase 3 seats on the plane so that X can lie down on the flight, while being accompanied by a private nurse.

Through Jeffrey’s advocacy for the welfare of migrant workers they are able to obtain work-injury compensation, or return home smoothly. Jeffrey says “I feel very emotional upon learning about the mistreatment of migrant workers. It gives me the motivation to continue helping them. Be it in assisting with the rescheduling of hospital appointments or in their negotiations with MOM or their employer, I will do it as long as it is within my capacity.”

Raising funds for a migrant friend with cancer

Jeffrey began volunteering with HealthServe since 2010 while working as a manager in an IT company. In the following year, he willingly took a paycut and joined HealthServe as a full-time employee.

Presently, Jeffrey has helped countless of migrant workers, and remains in contact with approximately 200 Chinese migrant brothers. He continues to care for them even after they have returned home. Twice a year, Jeffrey would travel to China to reconnect with the migrant workers he’s befriended. Every trip he would meet up with approximately 30 of them.

When he meets migrant brothers in dire health conditions, Jeffrey would sometimes take the initiative to raise funds for them. He would then personally fly to their home country to hand them the funds raised. There was an instance in which Jeffrey raised $10,000 for a migrant brother who was diagnosed with throat cancer in order to support his family of 4 children. Jeffrey also visited him twice in China to support him through these hard times.

500kg of rice and 60 litres of canola oil was donated to Care Corner Singapore Ltd

In commendation for Jeffrey’s acts of kindness, Song He Rice Company will be donating 500 kilograms of rice and 60 litres of Canola oil to Jeffrey’s organisation of choice - Care Corner Singapore Ltd. The organisation was founded in 1981. With 32 centres in Singapore, it provides assistance to 14,500 less-privileged individuals including the elderly, teenagers and children.